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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok guys i have polished some stuff before but looking to do it just on my own bike but alot faster or the fastest way their is.

I'll be polishing such things as a new drag axle,marvin shaws like new etc. What do you use? If your sanding first with 400grit,600? If so by hand or die grinder attachment,dremel or?

If using a dremel,air grinders etc where are you buying the sanding attachments and fine grit pads etc?

Also when buffing and doing the final finishing what type of compounds etc. Waniting it to look like chrome when i'm doing without taking me months to do it.

Any help would be great thanks Mark

I would just pay some of these polishing guys but dont want the down time and dont want to have to ship and tear all the parts off my bike.
 

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You are going to want to disassemble wether you do it or not. You are going to have to put the parts on a bench style wheel in order for you to do it in a timely fashion. You will be there forever w/a die grinder, dremel, etc. There is quite a bit to learn to do quality polishing but you could start at www.caswellplating.com. They have a forum and all the info you need is there. You can also buy all the supplies you would ever need from them or eastwoodcompany.com.
 

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QUOTE (kubitza123 @ Aug 22 2009, 07:35 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=53954I would just pay some of these polishing guys but dont want the down time and dont want to have to ship and tear all the parts off my bike.

LOL. its one thing if your just doing a gearshifter or kick lever, but if your planing to do cylinders and crankcases you would be better off haveing a professional shop do it...........unless you have ALOT of free time. polishing is a simple concept, but it takes alot of elbow grease if you dont have the right tools, and it sounds like you dont have the right tools LOL. you can use sand paper but pack a lunch and get ready for the long haul
 

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You can do touch-ups while it's still assembled, but to go from raw casting to polished you'll have to remove the cylinders.

I have an 80 gal compressor
die grinder, right angle grinder
3M rol-loc pads
200 - 400 - 600 - 800 - 1,000 - 1,500 grit sandpaper / rotary sanding bits
8" bench grinder with various wheels
White rouge, tripoli, emery compounds
Assortment of felt bobs to polish the tighter areas

The list goes on....

Caswell and eastwood do have just about everything you need to get a job done, along with tutorials. Having a large compressor is almost a must, 30 gallons is enough to get it done, but 55+ is recommended or you'll have the compressor running the entire time while sanding and polishing.

It's not "hard", just time consuming and tedious to do cylinders.

Heads, intakes, cases, side covers, axles, shocks, levers, etc are much simpler, but to do them properly, they must be removed from the bike.

Not to mention, it's an EXTREMELY dirty job, lol, I should call Mike Rowe next time I polish some cylinders
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah the little time i've spent polishing things it sucks. Any my cy's and cases are already polished just need alil cleaning up since working on it. I'll probably just send the parts off instead of spending a fortune on stuff i wont use much once the jobs done. Compressor etc no problem but sounds like more trouble than i want to get into.
 

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If it's already polished and needs just a touch up, grab a die grinder and get some small, loose sewn buffing wheels for it. Use white rouge compund and go to town.

If you have any major scratches to remove, use a tighter sewn wheel or polishing pad w/arbor with either tripoli or emery compund, then clean the surface, follow up with the rouge.

Or...if you want just a touch up, PM me and I'll give a great discount on touching up your items for you. Since the sanding is already done (the hard part) I can just run the parts over the wheel and save you some time and money (that you'd spend on materials).

If you still want to try it yourself, PM me with any detailed questions and I can help you out

 

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Astro tools offers a polishing kit that is pretty nice for around $100.00. The part # is model 3059. It comes in a nice aluminum case and has 2 sanding ball attachments and 4 polishing attachments plus white,blue and red rouges and a heavy duty die style tool.
 

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eastwood.com is the best place to go to. Click on Metal Polishing, I basically have all those tools to get er done. Hope you have a lot of time, and do yourself a favor and use a face mask and full face mask. Stuff gets in your lungs pretty damn fast, coughing that stuff up is no fun. First tool to invest in would be a bench polisher, don't get anything smaller than 3/4 HP.
 

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just chrome everything! it seems even after you polish crap it just gets crappy looking pretty soon and you have to go over them over and over and over again. but then again chrome tends to flake and come off after a few years also.



i have about 5 bikes with various billet polished bits and piece on them man it takes about 2 weeks to even get them some what looking good..



i know when i wash my bikes i have to clean them off really quickly or there will be hard water stains all over them and its a [censored] to get off..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I know what compounds to use etc since i have done some polishing. My question now is like on carbs,casses,cylinders etc what kinda polishing wheels are you guys using to get into the small places etc to polish them??? Have a pic or place youc an buy them? Links?
 

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I know what compounds to use etc since i have done some polishing. My question now is like on carbs,casses,cylinders etc what kinda polishing wheels are you guys using to get into the small places etc to polish them??? Have a pic or place youc an buy them? Links?


You have to use a porting tool, dremel, or die grinder to get into the tight spots.



Chrome is for steel, polish is for aluminum. I have no idea why anybody would chrome aluminum. It doesn't stick for sh*t.
 

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I know what compounds to use etc since i have done some polishing. My question now is like on carbs,casses,cylinders etc what kinda polishing wheels are you guys using to get into the small places etc to polish them??? Have a pic or place youc an buy them? Links?


Like Sonny mentioned, you'll need a die grinder or dremel with felt polishing bobs or small wheels w/ an arbor. They make different shapes and sizes to get in tight spots. Here's a cover I just finished up, had to use bobs to get everything.



Cam, if you clean the polished parts a certain way, they'll stay shiny. It's all in how you care for it. I don't go back over my stuff but once a year (over the winter) just to freshen it up to it's best.
 

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LOL



Frank Wilson told me this method of cleaning and it works awesome. That man has more tips and tricks than anyone I know, lol



Washing the bike:



Spray the whole thing with water, use just the water hose to get as much dirt as you can off of your bike. No rags, wash mits..just the water hose. Then, break out the simple green. Use the simple green on everything, wheels/tires, chassis, all aluminum, chrome, whole engine...the only thing I don't use it on is painted fenders and seats. Spray the bike good and let the simple green soak for a few minutes, but don't let it completely dry. I usually will do the bike in sections to make sure I catch it all before it dries. The front end/frame, then rear tires/frame/swingarm, then the engine bay. I do the engine last because when you're spraying off the tires, dirt usually flies everywhere and will get back on the engine you just cleaned, LOL.



The thing to remember is to not wipe your polished parts with anything to clean the dirt off them. Spray them with a water hose first, then soak it with simple green, let it sit for maybe 3-5 minutes, then come behind with the hose and spray off. The simple green will dissolve the dirt and the water will wash the remaining off. I let it air dry and most of the time I have no water spots or fine scratches. The only parts of my bike that I wipe off are the fenders, and if there is standing water I'll wipe that off with one of the microfiber polishing cloths. This is how I've washed my bike for years and it works great. Maybe 2 or 3 times during the year I'll touch up the polished parts with mothers billet polish, but that's it. I don't have to re-polish anything, at worst, over the winter, I'll run the parts under a soft wheel with some white rouge just to restore the luster.



I haven't run anything under the wheel since last February, that's when I polished the cylinders.

 

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i do the same thing, and use simple green. wipe off excess water with microfiber towel. I just started using Hollywood's polish from Cascade and it works great. Comes as a cotton towel, just tear a piece off and wipe the parts then wipe off with micro towel.
 

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I also use K&N Air filter cleaner for the carbs, engine and smaller nook and crannies.

It works awesome, but it's not nearly as cheap as Simple green, especially since you can get a gallon at Sam's or Costo for about 10 bucks or so and it's concentrated.



As far as polishing parts. There are just some things I've come to accept should be done by professionals.

It's a dirty, nasty job and this is definitely one of those things were you can spend an hour or two with the wrong tools or 10 minutes with the right ones.



I leave this to the pros...even the little items.
 

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yea i know my chrome side covers after about 8 years have started flaking..


Ya, and my steel exhaust pipes flaked after 2 weeks. What is your point? It is a common fact that chrome does not stick to aluminum like it does to steel.



Edit: So out of courtesy to our resident member Camatv...I decided to get in touch with a friend of mine who has been chroming parts for 35 years. To my surprise he agreed in that chrome plating does not stick to aluminum like it does to steel.



He said this was due to many reasons, but the foremost reason is because the pores of aluminum are much larger than the pores of steel. As a result, when the aluminum oxidizes it creates a much larger area where the nickle is no longer adhered to the part. He said there is no way to get around this due to the fact that aluminum immediately begins oxidizing as soon as it is removed from the tank.



So, hope that helps.
 
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